unLab - Grade 10

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TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
CC18Reaction – Acid & MetalAcids react with most metals to form salt and hydrogen gas. In this TACtivity, we react magnesium with citric acid to liberate some hydrogen gas. Inflate a balloon with the hydrogen gas and enjoy seeing the balloon float in air. Add a cotton thread to the bottom of the balloon and play around with the length of the thread to see the balloon go up and down.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
CO02DIY Multiple Test Tube StandSome experiments often require the use of a multiple test tube holder, useful for making comparisons and holding multiple test tubes side by side. Here, we make a test tube holder by making a loop using binding wire to hold the test tube and by wrapping the binding wire around an ice cream stick or any other object made from a poor conductor of heat. Make a slit in a foam base and insert the ice cream stick inside it to extend the test tube holder to a test tube stand. Add more slits and more test tube holders to make multiple test tubes stand next to each other.
CC08DIY Base (B)Commercially, sodium hydroxide is made through the electrolysis of brine solution. Here, we do the same, albeit on a much smaller scale, to make your own sodium hydroxide, the quintessential base, with hydrogen and chlorine as by-products.
CC21Reaction – Metal Reactivity SeriesThe ability of a metal to react with other chemicals is an important property of the metal and is called its Reactivity. In this TACtivity we take three metals – Copper, Iron and Magnesium – with different reactivities and test their behaviour by placing them in copper sulphate solution
CC23DIY Handmade SoapSaponification is the soap making process, which uses the basic solution lye and different types of fats. The science behind soap making is in the structure of the fats, the properties of the lye, and the chemical reaction that produces cleaning molecules. Not only is it a process that uses science, but it’s also just a fun activity to make your own soap with the features that you want.
BM02Respiration – AnaerobicYeast can respire even in the absence of oxygen – breaking down sugar, releasing carbon dioxide and other by products. Here, yeast is allowed to act on sugar water in a bottle, the mouth of which is sealed with a balloon. Over time, as the yeast starts to digest the sugar, the balloon starts to inflate! This process is called anaerobic respiration and is also used to make alcohol commercially.PACK OF 6
BA05DIY StethoscopeA stethoscope is a medical instrument to listen to a patient’s heartbeat or breathing, and typically has a small disc-shaped resonator that is placed against the chest, and two tubes connected to earpieces. Here, we insert pipes in a cut ball and insert binding wire to the pipes to give them the shape of a stethoscope. Foam pieces are fixed at the other end of the rubber pipes to make the ear plugs.
BA33Kidney ModelThe kidneys’ job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes, control the body’s fluid balance, and keep the right levels of electrolytes. We use a Visking or Dialysis tube, a semi-permeable membrane, to understand the functioning of a kidney in this TACtivity.
BA06Brain ModelThe human brain is one of the most complex creations of nature, especially if one has to understand its finer structure. However, the brain can be divided into several segments, each responsible for a different function. Here, we make a paper mache model of the brain by sticking coloured paper pieces, depicting the different segments of the brain, on an inflated balloon
PL18DIY Optic BenchAn optical bench is a versatile tool useful in conducting a series of optics experiments, involving lenses and mirrors. It is particularly useful when two or more optical elements need to be placed in a straight line and at a fixed level so that their optical axes align.

Here, we make our own Optical Bench using foam, skewers, straws and graph paper, and conduct various focal length experiments using lenses and/or mirrors.
CC07DIY BatteryThe Voltaic cell was one of the first batteries to be invented and the principle behind its operation is still used in some modern batteries. A simple ‘wet’ cell consists of two metal plates, in this case magnesium and copper, separated by a liquid, in this case citric acid or baking soda solution. Known as the electrolyte, this liquid serves as a channel for balancing the charge between the electrodes when the cell is being discharged. Here, we connect the “electrodes” (magnesium and copper strips) to an LED, which lights up after the cells are dipped in the electrolyte.
PM06DC Motor ModelThis amazingly simple model of a DC Motor allows you to experience various facets of electromagnetism first-hand. The simple design and materials allow you to play with, experiment and tinker with this model and discover the properties of electricity and magnetism yourself. Current from the battery flowing through the copper coil makes it an electromagnet (Oersted’s Law), which in turn interacts with permanent magnets, providing a thrust for the copper coil to rotate. All electric motors in the world work on the same principle. Here you make, play with, tinker and experiment with a brilliantly simple model first-hand.

TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
BP23Plant Life – TransportationHow does water climb about 100 metres to reach the leaves of the great Redwood pines? Using some filter paper, straws, a wooden skewer and food colouring, this TACtivity models the transportation in a plant. This model helps to understand the movement of water and minerals to the functional area of the tree i.e., leaves.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
BA05DIY StethoscopeA stethoscope is a medical instrument to listen to a patient’s heartbeat or breathing, and typically has a small disc-shaped resonator that is placed against the chest, and two tubes connected to earpieces. Here, we insert pipes in a cut ball and insert binding wire to the pipes to give them the shape of a stethoscope. Foam pieces are fixed at the other end of the rubber pipes to make the ear plugs.
BA33Kidney ModelThe kidneys’ job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes, control the body’s fluid balance, and keep the right levels of electrolytes. We use a Visking or Dialysis tube, a semi-permeable membrane, to understand the functioning of a kidney in this TACtivity.
CC20Reaction – PrecipitationA precipitation reaction is a chemical reaction in which two soluble solutions react with each other to form a precipitate (insoluble salt).

In this TACtivity, you will mix copper sulphate solution and sodium bicarbonate solution to see a precipitate getting formed. What is it?
CC07DIY BatteryThe Voltaic cell was one of the first batteries to be invented and the principle behind its operation is still used in some modern batteries. A simple ‘wet’ cell consists of two metal plates, in this case magnesium and copper, separated by a liquid, in this case citric acid or baking soda solution. Known as the electrolyte, this liquid serves as a channel for balancing the charge between the electrodes when the cell is being discharged. Here, we connect the “electrodes” (magnesium and copper strips) to an LED, which lights up after the cells are dipped in the electrolyte.
CC06DIY AcidAcids are chemical substances which are sour in taste and have a pH below 7. They can corrode metals. Aqueous solutions of acids are electrolytes, meaning that they conduct electrical current. In this TACtivity, we are going to prepare an acid by the electrolysis of copper sulphate solution.PACK OF 6
CC22Reaction – Ammonia GasSmell is one of the most intense of senses. It is one closely
associated with memories of place and time. It plays strongly on our emotions. It’s also nature’s way of warning us about what to avoid and what we are attracted to. Here, we create one of the most pungent smells around, and realise the power of chemical changes. This is also a remarkable reaction because it absorbs huge amounts of heat and is a classic endothermic reaction.
PF01Straw PropellerNewton’s Third Law of Motion is one of the most beautifully succinct laws. So much so, that it seems obvious to most who read it. However, few really understand the law and this TACtivity – made by inserting a thin straw through holes made in the middle of a fat straw – goes a long way in addressing many of those misconceptions and clarifying several other fundamental concepts in physics.
PM11Magnetism – LevitationObserve a pen appearing to float in air because of forces from different directions balancing it.

Mount two magnets on a pen about 2 cm from each end. On a foam piece, create slots and insert four magnets in a specific orientation. Insert an ice cream stick piece at one end and levitate the pen horizontally! The polarity of the magnets is critical to this TACtivity.
PM15DIY Battery HolderRegular electrical cells available in the market are typically 1.5V. However, several appliances need a larger voltage to work. Even LEDs need a minimum of 1.9V to light up. This requires connecting 2 or more cells in series. To do this in a robust manner, one needs battery holders.

In this TACtivity, you make your own 2-cell battery holder using a foam piece, some metal strips and electrical wire.
PL06Explore Optic FibreOptical fibres use a phenomenon known as total internal reflection to allow light to travel along a curved path. The light itself never actually bends, instead, it’s reflected off the internal walls of the fibre. As long as the angle of reflection of the light is greater than what is called the critical angle it will travel quite far without much loss. Thus it’s used as a way to send light (with coded information) over huge distances for communication and data services.

Here, you explore the properties of optic fibres by building a simple circuit, and connecting it to LEDs, which are shone through optic fibres and straws. Is there a difference?
PM06DC Motor ModelThis amazingly simple model of a DC Motor allows you to experience various facets of electromagnetism first-hand. The simple design and materials allow you to play with, experiment and tinker with this model and discover the properties of electricity and magnetism yourself. Current from the battery flowing through the copper coil makes it an electromagnet (Oersted’s Law), which in turn interacts with permanent magnets, providing a thrust for the copper coil to rotate. All electric motors in the world work on the same principle. Here you make, play with, tinker and experiment with a brilliantly simple model first-hand.