unLab - Grade 3

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TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
BP20Seed Dispersal ModelsSeed dispersal is the movement or the transport of seeds from one place to another by a vector (animal, wind, water). Seeds are dispersed naturally and manually. In this TACtivity, we will learn the different patterns and modes of seed dispersal using very simple materials.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
PT02Magnet SpinnerRing magnets behave fascinatingly when inserted into any metal rod that is magnetic, e.g. an iron rod. Here, we use a cycle spoke as the rod and notice the wonderful behaviour of the magnets as they spin down the spoke! This causes vibrations at the bottom of the spoke, where a cardboard spinner spins rapidly as the magnets descend! Does changing the number of magnets change anything? What are the forces involved in the functioning of this enjoyable TACtivity?
PM13DIY CompassThe Earth happens to have its own magnetic field; in other words, it is a giant magnet in itself, because it has a rotating magnetic core. It is one of the reasons life exists on Earth, as the magnetic field provides a protective zone around the Earth preventing dangerous high energy particles penetrating our atmosphere and affecting our cells.

In this TACtivity, we make a compass of our own, using magnets and a template to mount them in, to determine the orientation of the Earth’s magnetic field.
PL20DIY MicroscopeA microscope is an instrument used to observe very minute/small objects that are not visible to the naked eye. It consists of a diverging (convex/biconvex) lens, which enlarges the small objects to make it visible to the human eye.

In this TACtivity, we will make a microscope using glass beads (which act as the biconvex lens) and explore it by adjusting its focus to get a clear image and viewing some interesting objects.
BP12Microscope – Leaf VenationObserving the veins on different kinds of leaves is a great way to not only appreciate how water and nutrients are transported in plants, but is also an effective tool in identifying plants and their types. In this TACtivity, you use your own DIY Microscope to observe leaf venations on all kinds of leaves
BP03Fibre – WeavingCloth is made by interweaving various fibres into a single stronger thread, which can then be woven into cloth. Here, we simulate that experience by using strips of satin ribbon and threads to weave a mat on a piece of cardboard.PACK OF 6
BA09Respiration – Lung CapacityOur lungs are amongst one of our most vital and fascinating organs. All kinds of statistics about them boggle the mind. In this TACtivity, using a long polythene bag, we make an incredibly simple yet versatile implement to measure the volume of air you can exhale in each breath, for various different conditions. Your lung capacity is a key indicator of your general well-being.
BA10Lung ModelOur lungs are amongst one of our most vital and fascinating organs. To perform the act of breathing, they are assisted heavily by a lesser-known but equally vital organ: the diaphragm. In this TACtivity, we use a cut bottle, some straws and a few balloons to simulate the dual functioning of the lungs and the diaphragm.
CC10Fire Extinguisher ModelFires kill more than a hundred thousand people every year worldwide. The numbers would be far higher were there no fire extinguishers and fire persons to deal with them. How are they extinguished? What can be done to save more lives, if help is not near at hand? Fire requires 3 key ingredients: material to burn, oxygen and an initial temperature high enough to ignite the material. Take any one of these 3 out, and you have yourself a potentially effective fire extinguisher. In this experiment, we produce carbon dioxide using a classic reaction, and use that to douse a candle flame by literally “pouring” it over the flame.
PM07Magnetism – Field LinesMagnetic field lines are used to represent magnetic fields. They are continuous and form a closed loop, conventionally directed from the north magnetic pole to the south.

In this TACtivity, we use bar magnets, ring magnets, a cardboard piece and iron filings to observe magnetic field lines.
PF21Shower ModelLiquids do not have a definite shape, and hence apply pressure equally in all directions when stored in a container. Pressure can be caused by gravity, acceleration or by forces outside a closed container.

In this TACtivity, we learn about liquid (fluid) pressure, by making a shower using a plastic bottle, a bottle cap with a hole and coloured water. We create a shower, which we can turn on and off by opening and closing the hole in the bottle cap with our finger!
CC15Food Test – StarchThe food we eat contains various nutrients that are required by the body. One of these vital components is starch. Here, we use iodine solution on various food samples to test for the presence of starch in them

TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
BA09Respiration – Lung CapacityOur lungs are amongst one of our most vital and fascinating organs. All kinds of statistics about them boggle the mind. In this TACtivity, using a long polythene bag, we make an incredibly simple yet versatile implement to measure the volume of air you can exhale in each breath, for various different conditions. Your lung capacity is a key indicator of your general well-being.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
BA10Lung ModelOur lungs are amongst one of our most vital and fascinating organs. To perform the act of breathing, they are assisted heavily by a lesser-known but equally vital organ: the diaphragm. In this TACtivity, we use a cut bottle, some straws and a few balloons to simulate the dual functioning of the lungs and the diaphragm.
BE01Boat ModelUsing the energy stored in a rubber band, make a self-propelled bottle boat using ice-cream sticks as the propeller. This demonstrates how ducks swim and how ships propel themselves.
CO01DIY Test Tube StandSome experiments often require the use of a test tube holder and/or stand. Here we make a test tube holder by making a loop using binding wire to hold the test tube and by wrapping the binding wire around an ice cream stick or any other object made from a poor conductor of heat. Make a slit in a foam base and insert the ice cream stick inside it to extend the test tube holder to a test tube stand.
CP02DIY Lip BalmSubstances can be mixed, without reacting chemically, to form another substance with different physical characteristics. This is often called a physical change. In this TACtivity, using purely natural materials, such as beeswax, edible oils and a fragrant essential oil, we create a lovely-smelling lip balm that should soothe your chapped lips.
BP04DIY Herbal PesticideChemical and natural pesticides have been used by farmers and gardeners around the world for time immemorial to prevent their crops or plants from being jeopardised by so-called “pests”. While the negative effects of chemical fertilisers are well-known, certain herbal pesticides may still be effective and useful without being harmful. In this TACtivity, we make one such concoction out of neem oil and soap waterPACK OF 6
BP16Plant Life – GerminationGermination is the process of a seed developing into a new plant and depends on the amount of water, air, temperature and sunlight supplied to it. Water plays an important role for seeds to germinate.

In this TACtivity, we compare the germination rate of different seeds when fully submerged in water, partially submerged in water and exposed to air without water.
PF27Fluid – Viscous FlowHow a liquid flows depends a lot on the physical characteristics of the liquid. One of these properties is called its Viscosity, which can be quite easily viewed or felt as the “thickness” of the liquid. This should not be confused with a liquid’s density! For example, oil is more viscous than water, but less dense than water. Alternatively, honey is more viscous than water and more dense than water.

In this TACtivity, we mount a couple of containers on a stand, using skewers, and then observe and compare the flow rate of various liquids as they trickle down the nylon thread attached between the containers.
CP13Matter – Gas MassWe are often told that all matter has mass. We know that gas is a form of matter, so it must have mass! However, have you ever tried proving that gas has mass? In this ingenious experiment, we use a self-made beam balance and a couple of balloons to discover for yourself whether gas has mass or not!
CP11Matter – CompressibilityThere are three different states of matter, namely, solid, liquid and gas. Each of these states has different properties and here, we will focus on understanding their compressibility property. Compressibility refers to the reduction in a substance’s volume when pressure is applied to it.

In this TACtivity, we will test the compressibility of different states of matter using a syringe.
CP22Matter – SolubilityDifferent solvents have varying solubilities for different solutes. Here, we test the solubility of common salt in water at varying temperatures and the impact of stirring.
CP29Density – Shrink & SinkThe density of an object is nothing but the ratio of its mass to its volume. In a fluid, objects that are less dense than the fluid will float, whereas those denser than the fluid will sink. In this TACtivity, a balloon is partially inflated and a nut is suspended from it with a thread such that the whole assembly floats in water. This is then inserted into a plastic bottle filled to the brim with water and closed tightly shut. When you squeeze the bottle, the balloon should start to sink! How and why?
CP20Physical Change – WaterOne of the many incredible properties water has is that we can quite easily convert it to steam or to ice, by heating and cooling, respectively. Water being in liquid form is the primary reason life exists on Earth, which happens to enjoy temperatures in the liquid-solid range. In this TACtivity, we heat and cool water to observe and enjoy the processes that change its states of matter: freezing/melting and vaporisation/condensation