unLab - Grade 4

Click to purchase

TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
PF08Hand Cart ModelHumans have been using different forms of transport for more than a few millennia to make their life and work simpler, faster, more efficient and more fun! The development of the wheel has been one of the most significant breakthroughs of human endeavour. Through rapid progress in the industrial age, we have reached previously unimaginable heights in transport technology. Here, we make a simple toy cart using foam, skewers and bottle caps, that can be steered as you explore the forces involved when the cart moves.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
PS09Vibrating Membrane ModelSound is produced when an object vibrates fast enough to agitate particles around it, which then transfer that energy to adjacent molecules to create a pressure wave in a given medium. Not only does sound need a medium to travel, there needs to be an impetus to cause a disturbance in the medium to manifest itself as sound.

In this joyous TACtivity, you make your own Bugle, using a balloon as the vibrating membrane and attaching it to different lengths of PVC pipe to create sounds of beauty and wonder!
BP08Wick Irrigation ModelVarious irrigation techniques are used world over to water agricultural as well as domestic plants. In this remarkable water-saving wick-irrigation system, we use waste plastic bottles and some strips of waste cloth to sow and grow seeds in a cocopeat base, and observe the rate of plant growth as well as water usage
PF28Water Sprinkler ModelA water sprinkler is a device used to spray water on plants in a field or garden. It is also used to irrigate (or supply water to) crops, lawns, golf courses, etc.

In this TACtivity, we will learn to create a water sprinkler model – in essence a centrifugal pump – using straws and a stick. You will see that when the straws are partially submerged and twirled in water, a beautiful sprinkle emerges from the slits in the straw.
BA22Body Joints – FingersWith three joints and a length comparable to that of the palm, human fingers can be utilised for achieving a great variety of work. The thumb is an exception, with two joints instead of three, and a different angle compared to other fingers. In fact, it is the opposable thumb that evolutionary biologists credit with being the main anatomical difference between us and the great apes that has allowed us to be the most dextrous and creative beings ever known. Here, we model the human fingers using string, cardboard and foam so as to appreciate the value of its unique design and its evolution with time.
BE01Boat ModelUsing the energy stored in a rubber band, make a self-propelled bottle boat using ice-cream sticks as the propeller. This demonstrates how ducks swim and how ships propel themselves.PACK OF 6
PM03DIY ElectromagnetA current carrying conductor produces a magnetic field, i.e. it becomes an electromagnet. In this TACtivity, we wind enamelled copper wire around a nail and connect the two ends of the wire to a cell. How does the nail start to behave? Can it start to lift iron filings, or does it have an effect on paper/safety pins?
CP13Matter – Gas MassWe are often told that all matter has mass. We know that gas is a form of matter, so it must have mass! However, have you ever tried proving that gas has mass? In this ingenious experiment, we use a self-made beam balance and a couple of balloons to discover for yourself whether gas has mass or not!
PL23Box Pinhole CameraA pinhole camera is a simple camera without a lens but with a tiny aperture. When light passes through this tiny aperture, it projects an upside down image of the object being observed through the aperture. In this TACtivity, we will make a pinhole camera using a chart paper, butter paper, and tape to see lovely inverted images.
CC25Acids & Bases – Turmeric IndicatorThere are many wonderful natural acid-base indicators. One such ubiquitous food item in Indian households is turmeric powder. The dazzling yellow of turmeric turns a deep red when exposed to a basic/alkaline substance. However, it remains yellow if the test sample is neutral or acidic. The deep red powder created by exposing turmeric to a basic substance is nothing but vermilion, which is now your natural acid indicator, as it will turn back to yellow (turmeric) when exposed to an acidic solution, but will remain a deep red when exposed to a basic or neutral substance. Enjoy testing various household items, edible and non-edible, for their acidity or alkalinity!
PF20Parachute ModelUsing plastic sheets of different sizes and pieces of thread to make a parachute, you can show how the area of a surface affects air drag/resistance and how various objects – both in nature and man-made – use this principle to their benefit.

TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
CC15Food Test – StarchThe food we eat contains various nutrients that are required by the body. One of these vital components is starch. Here, we use iodine solution on various food samples to test for the presence of starch in themPACK OF 4PACK OF 10
BA33Kidney ModelThe kidneys’ job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes, control the body’s fluid balance, and keep the right levels of electrolytes. We use a Visking or Dialysis tube, a semi-permeable membrane, to understand the functioning of a kidney in this TACtivity.
BO01Camel Foot ModelThrough evolution, animals have adapted in myriad ways, to survive and thrive in their habitats. One of the more fascinating adaptations is that of hooves/feet of mammals. Here, we make models of camel and horse feet with a simple set of materials, and observe how they behave differently in a bed of sand.
PT02Magnet SpinnerRing magnets behave fascinatingly when inserted into any metal rod that is magnetic, e.g. an iron rod. Here, we use a cycle spoke as the rod and notice the wonderful behaviour of the magnets as they spin down the spoke! This causes vibrations at the bottom of the spoke, where a cardboard spinner spins rapidly as the magnets descend! Does changing the number of magnets change anything? What are the forces involved in the functioning of this enjoyable TACtivity?
PF03Thread ClimberFriction is a retarding force, always opposing the relative motion, between any two surfaces. In this TACtivity, we use friction to create a “climber”, with the help of straw pieces, some thread and a cardboard cutout.
CP13Matter – Gas MassWe are often told that all matter has mass. We know that gas is a form of matter, so it must have mass! However, have you ever tried proving that gas has mass? In this ingenious experiment, we use a self-made beam balance and a couple of balloons to discover for yourself whether gas has mass or not!
PACK OF 6
BA16DIY RespirometerChemical reactions often create a change in colour. Here, we use a classic acid-base indicator to make a simple “respirometer”, which can be used to estimate your metabolic rate as you blow into a solution of slaked lime.
CQ05Beam Balance ModelMass is one of the fundamental units of measurement. The classic device to measure mass is a beam balance. In this TACtivity, you make your own beam balance – and using nuts (or other items) of known mass – calibrate any unknown masses, such as stones.
CQ04Measure – LengthLength is one of the fundamental units of measurement. It is often the first thing we are taught how to measure. In this enjoyable TACtivity, using matchsticks, beads and a piece of string, we measure the length/perimeter of regular objects followed by any oddly shaped track/object, e.g. the length of India’s coasts and/or borders. We then compare which methods give the most accurate results
PL11Light – OpacityOpacity is the measure of impenetrability to light. In radiative transfer, it describes absorption and scattering. In this TACtivity, we measure the opacity of different materials and the impact of colour on Opacity.
PF08Hand Cart ModelHumans have been using different forms of transport for more than a few millennia to make their life and work simpler, faster, more efficient and more fun! The development of the wheel has been one of the most significant breakthroughs of human endeavour. Through rapid progress in the industrial age, we have reached previously unimaginable heights in transport technology. Here, we make a simple toy cart using foam, skewers and bottle caps, that can be steered as you explore the forces involved when the cart moves.
BP23Plant Life – TransportationHow does water climb about 100 metres to reach the leaves of the great Redwood pines? Using some filter paper, straws, a wooden skewer and food colouring, this TACtivity models the transportation in a plant. This model helps to understand the movement of water and minerals to the functional area of the tree i.e., leaves.
BP17Plant Life – TranspirationTranspiration is one of the natural processes vital for a plant’s survival. Without transpiration, a plant will not be able to suck up water from the roots to reach every nook and corner of the plant. In this simple experiment, we observe the effects of transpiration by covering a few leaves of a living plant with an airtight transparent polythene bag.