unLab - Grade 8

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TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
BM02Respiration – AnaerobicYeast can respire even in the absence of oxygen – breaking down sugar, releasing carbon dioxide and other by products. Here, yeast is allowed to act on sugar water in a bottle, the mouth of which is sealed with a balloon. Over time, as the yeast starts to digest the sugar, the balloon starts to inflate! This process is called anaerobic respiration and is also used to make alcohol commercially.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
CC18Reaction – Acid & MetalAcids react with most metals to form salt and hydrogen gas. In this TACtivity, we react magnesium with citric acid to liberate some hydrogen gas. Inflate a balloon with the hydrogen gas and enjoy seeing the balloon float in air. Add a cotton thread to the bottom of the balloon and play around with the length of the thread to see the balloon go up and down.
CC10Fire Extinguisher ModelFires kill more than a hundred thousand people every year worldwide. The numbers would be far higher were there no fire extinguishers and fire persons to deal with them. How are they extinguished? What can be done to save more lives, if help is not near at hand? Fire requires 3 key ingredients: material to burn, oxygen and an initial temperature high enough to ignite the material. Take any one of these 3 out, and you have yourself a potentially effective fire extinguisher. In this experiment, we produce carbon dioxide using a classic reaction, and use that to douse a candle flame by literally “pouring” it over the flame.
PL20DIY MicroscopeA microscope is an instrument used to observe very minute/small objects that are not visible to the naked eye. It consists of a diverging (convex/biconvex) lens, which enlarges the small objects to make it visible to the human eye.

In this TACtivity, we will make a microscope using glass beads (which act as the biconvex lens) and explore it by adjusting its focus to get a clear image and viewing some interesting objects.
BP13Microscope – Epidermal CellsThe onion peel is so fascinating because with your bare hands, you can easily peel off a unicellular layer from this very tasty stem vegetable. This peel can then be placed on a microscope slide and “stained”, so that you may observe the wonderful brick-like structure of onion plant cells through your own DIY Microscope
PF31Trolley ModelNewton’s Second Law of Motion talks about how the net force acting on a body is directly proportional to the mass of the body and acceleration it experiences.

In this ingenious TACtivity, we use our own Hand Cart to conduct a series of experiments to discover for yourself the relationship between mass and acceleration
PACK OF 6
PF12Paper ProjectileWhat is the path of an object when it is launched? Does it depend on the initial speed of the object? What about the angle of launch? We observe this and much more in this TACtivity. Using a piece of fat straw, a launch-angle measuring device called a sextant, and some paper darts, we launch the paper darts by blowing them through the straw to see what impact they make on a newspaper screen!
PF03Thread ClimberFriction is a retarding force, always opposing the relative motion, between any two surfaces. In this TACtivity, we use friction to create a “climber”, with the help of straw pieces, some thread and a cardboard cutout.
PS09Vibrating Membrane ModelSound is produced when an object vibrates fast enough to agitate particles around it, which then transfer that energy to adjacent molecules to create a pressure wave in a given medium. Not only does sound need a medium to travel, there needs to be an impetus to cause a disturbance in the medium to manifest itself as sound.

In this joyous TACtivity, you make your own Bugle, using a balloon as the vibrating membrane and attaching it to different lengths of PVC pipe to create sounds of beauty and wonder!
CC36DIY ElectroplatingElectroplating is a process by which one metal surface is coated with another, and this is done for various possible reasons, e.g. aesthetics, to prevent rusting etc.

In this lovely TACtivity, we use the process of electrolysis to coat an iron nail with copper as both these electrodes are dipped in a copper sulphate solution and exposed to an electric current using a AA cell.
PM15DIY Battery HolderRegular electrical cells available in the market are typically 1.5V. However, several appliances need a larger voltage to work. Even LEDs need a minimum of 1.9V to light up. This requires connecting 2 or more cells in series. To do this in a robust manner, one needs battery holders.

In this TACtivity, you make your own 2-cell battery holder using a foam piece, some metal strips and electrical wire.
PL06Explore Optic FibreOptical fibres use a phenomenon known as total internal reflection to allow light to travel along a curved path. The light itself never actually bends, instead, it’s reflected off the internal walls of the fibre. As long as the angle of reflection of the light is greater than what is called the critical angle it will travel quite far without much loss. Thus it’s used as a way to send light (with coded information) over huge distances for communication and data services.

Here, you explore the properties of optic fibres by building a simple circuit, and connecting it to LEDs, which are shone through optic fibres and straws. Is there a difference?

TCodeTACtivity NameTACtivity DescriptionPacks
PF01Straw PropellerNewton’s Third Law of Motion is one of the most beautifully succinct laws. So much so, that it seems obvious to most who read it. However, few really understand the law and this TACtivity – made by inserting a thin straw through holes made in the middle of a fat straw – goes a long way in addressing many of those misconceptions and clarifying several other fundamental concepts in physics.PACK OF 4PACK OF 10
PL20DIY MicroscopeA microscope is an instrument used to observe very minute/small objects that are not visible to the naked eye. It consists of a diverging (convex/biconvex) lens, which enlarges the small objects to make it visible to the human eye.

In this TACtivity, we will make a microscope using glass beads (which act as the biconvex lens) and explore it by adjusting its focus to get a clear image and viewing some interesting objects.
BP15Microscope – StemThe stem of a plant is like its lifeline, its spine. Here, we take vertical and horizontal cross-sections of various plant stems to observe their finer structure through your own DIY Microscope
PS09Vibrating Membrane ModelSound is produced when an object vibrates fast enough to agitate particles around it, which then transfer that energy to adjacent molecules to create a pressure wave in a given medium. Not only does sound need a medium to travel, there needs to be an impetus to cause a disturbance in the medium to manifest itself as sound.

In this joyous TACtivity, you make your own Bugle, using a balloon as the vibrating membrane and attaching it to different lengths of PVC pipe to create sounds of beauty and wonder!
PM27ElectroscopeAn electroscope is a classic instrument that can detect the presence of charge on a body. It uses the principle that like charges repel, demonstrated by two metal foils moving away from each other when a charge is induced on them.

Here, you will make your electroscope using aluminium foil and a copper coil, and observe by how much the foils separate when a charged object is brought near the copper coil
CC22Reaction – Ammonia GasSmell is one of the most intense of senses. It is one closely
associated with memories of place and time. It plays strongly on our emotions. It’s also nature’s way of warning us about what to avoid and what we are attracted to. Here, we create one of the most pungent smells around, and realise the power of chemical changes. This is also a remarkable reaction because it absorbs huge amounts of heat and is a classic endothermic reaction.
PACK OF 6
PM15DIY Battery HolderRegular electrical cells available in the market are typically 1.5V. However, several appliances need a larger voltage to work. Even LEDs need a minimum of 1.9V to light up. This requires connecting 2 or more cells in series. To do this in a robust manner, one needs battery holders.

In this TACtivity, you make your own 2-cell battery holder using a foam piece, some metal strips and electrical wire.
CH02DIY Bimetallic StripA bimetallic strip is used to convert a temperature change into mechanical displacement. It consists of two different metal strips stuck together along their length. The direction of the bending of the strip changes accordingly on heating and cooling. In this TACtivity, you make your own bimetallic strip by gluing two strips of different metal to each other and observe their different rates of thermal expansion
CC19DIY ElectrolysisElectrolysis is a chemical process, which uses electric current to separate chemical compounds. Electric current is passed through electrodes immersed in an aqueous solution, known as an electrolyte. Electrolysis has many applications, such as in the separation of metals from their ores.

In this TACtivity, we will perform electrolysis of water using table salt (NaCl), connecting wires, an AA cell, iron nails and a waste plastic bottle. Do you see any bubbles? Does the solution change colour?
CP22Matter – SolubilityDifferent solvents have varying solubilities for different solutes. Here, we test the solubility of common salt in water at varying temperatures and the impact of stirring.
CP08DIY Copper Sulphate CrystalsOne of the most classic, and also fascinating, ways to grow a crystal. The dazzling blue colour of copper sulphate makes it visually one of the most appealing crystals. A saturated solution of copper sulphate is allowed to cool in a container. Over time (several hours to days) crystals start forming at the bottom of the container. By routinely filtering out the solution and re-introducing the filtered solution to the growing crystal(s), one should be able to grow large, blue crystals of copper sulphate
BA33Kidney ModelThe kidneys’ job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes, control the body’s fluid balance, and keep the right levels of electrolytes. We use a Visking or Dialysis tube, a semi-permeable membrane, to understand the functioning of a kidney in this TACtivity.